Grumbles, Glory, Corona and All Your Off Topic Discussions

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Profile Jord
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Message 108217 - Posted: 24 May 2022, 14:32:23 UTC - in response to Message 108211.  

It'll continue to nag, now with a little "Windows Update" icon in the system tray. But where this normally has a red ball to show it needs to reboot, it now shows a green or blue ball and when hovering over it, it'll show that Windows 11 is ready to be installed. Luckily you can right click the icon and hide it for now.
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Profile Dave
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Message 108219 - Posted: 24 May 2022, 17:11:06 UTC

One area where even most ardent Windows fans agree Linux is better. If an update needs a reboot to take full effect, it just tells you, a reboot is needed to complete the update and gives you the option to restart then or later. I really don't understand why MS can't follow that policy?
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Profile Jord
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Message 108220 - Posted: 24 May 2022, 18:18:41 UTC - in response to Message 108219.  

Who says they can't?
I have often enough that I've seen quite large updates come in and the system doesn't need a reboot. At other times when it does need a reboot, it'll tell me it needs to reboot to finalize the installation of that package, but that I can choose to reboot now or do it later (usually middle of the night). I then tell it not to reboot and when I shut down the system allow the updates to happen and the system to shut down afterwards.
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Profile Gary Charpentier
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Message 108223 - Posted: 25 May 2022, 0:40:55 UTC - in response to Message 108221.  

And who designed those systems so insecurely anyway, that they need fixing twice a week?
You did.
IT is is what you make it.
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Profile Dave
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Message 108224 - Posted: 25 May 2022, 6:17:38 UTC - in response to Message 108221.  

Despite using Linux, I still run ClamAV regularly to lower the risk of my passing on a virus to friends with Windows. So far the only things it has caught are on Spam emails I wouldn't have passed on anyway but I like to think of myself as a responsible person. (most of the time.)
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Message 108228 - Posted: 25 May 2022, 17:02:33 UTC - in response to Message 108226.  

Horrendously simple to do.
There are parts of an email that one does not always see unless one looks really hard in the right places. These are normally used to provide pathing and routing details, but they can be used for nefarious means, such as auto-open links that you can't see but can carry or deliver anything the perpetrator desires.
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Message 108230 - Posted: 25 May 2022, 19:14:24 UTC - in response to Message 108229.  

You DO NOT have to open these hidden links, just preview the text of the message, or even view the subject for them to become active.
Just about EVERY email program is susceptible to these forms of attack as they use the core of the email system. But MS have a very poor record of assuming you want to preview everything, and thus increase the chances of exposure.
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Message 108234 - Posted: 25 May 2022, 20:31:37 UTC - in response to Message 108232.  

It's not the text that contains the virus, but the surrounding header, prefix, suffix and routing information that calls up a hidden, automatic, link that causes the virus to be delivered - and all the victim has done is look at the title and preview for this to happen.
Also, not everything that looks like text is actually "real plain" text, it can be a very simple form of hypertext, but it can hide all sorts of nasties.
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Profile Jord
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Message 108235 - Posted: 25 May 2022, 20:41:15 UTC - in response to Message 108232.  

Text cannot be a virus. An image cannot be a virus. Only a very stupid email program would run code inside an email!
ROFL, I see your act of getting into a continuous discussion hasn't gotten any better. Peter knows better about all than anyone else.

Newsflash: You can get a computer virus from an image, some images are even specifically written to encompass a virus in their code. You don't have to believe me of course, because who am I? But maybe you believe the internet.

Your email program would have to be as badly written as Boinc to do that.
I must have missed your personal endeavour to write and compile a better client, manager, screen saver, back-end programs and server software than the present BOINC developers are doing. It's open source, so chop chop, show the world you can do better. Maybe start in Open Lowcode? Must be easy for someone like you, who always knows better than everyone else.
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Richard Haselgrove
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Message 108236 - Posted: 25 May 2022, 21:13:12 UTC

I discovered a virus once: https://www.computerweekly.com/news/2240043325/BT-Openworld-sends-virus-to-customers

Virus writers are cunning and devious. That one first appeared (and was sent to me by email) on the BT server at about 9 pm on the Friday of US Thanksgiving weekend. Everyone was asleep at the wheel.

The virus checkers of the day only looked for matches to known patterns. This pattern was unknown, so it slipped through. Badtrans-B went on to become one of the commonest pests to date.

I rang up a UK-based AV firm (the name escapes me at this time of night) on Saturday morning. Kudos to them: they answered the phone immediately, acknowledged that it sounded like a serious report, called one of their specialists into the office, asked me to test the potential fix, and had it published by about 4 pm. The American firms didn't react until Monday.
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Profile Keith Myers
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Message 108240 - Posted: 26 May 2022, 1:31:19 UTC - in response to Message 108219.  

One area where even most ardent Windows fans agree Linux is better. If an update needs a reboot to take full effect, it just tells you, a reboot is needed to complete the update and gives you the option to restart then or later. I really don't understand why MS can't follow that policy?

Linux isn't entirely blameless either. Or maybe its just Ubuntu. I've had three teammates dump gpu work recently because the Ubuntu hosts pulled the Nvidia drivers out from underneath the running tasks without informing the user it was going to do that. Ubuntu deems Nvidia updates as security level updates normally and believes that takes precedence over asking permission to do so.

Thank goodness there is sudo apt-mark hold nvidia-driver* to prevent that from happening if the user cares about such issue.


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