Grumbles, Glory and Covid-19 (2)

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Peter Hucker
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Message 103850 - Posted: 5 Apr 2021, 17:26:02 UTC - in response to Message 103840.  

No birth, no vote, no say, isn't that called slavery?
Exactly, but the sheep just keep on accepting it. I wonder what would happen if 99% of the population didn't vote?
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Message 103851 - Posted: 5 Apr 2021, 17:35:05 UTC - in response to Message 103826.  

I am not averse to a little risk when I am in control of the situation. In a car it is all too easy to be injured as a result of someone else's actions.
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Peter Hucker
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Message 103852 - Posted: 5 Apr 2021, 17:42:44 UTC - in response to Message 103851.  

I am not averse to a little risk when I am in control of the situation. In a car it is all too easy to be injured as a result of someone else's actions.
Insurance companies say otherwise. Did you know if I crash into you, that on average my premium goes up £130 a year, and yours £110. They say it's because good drivers avoid accidents, they now class you as more likely to have a crash because you didn't avoid me.

And wow to the gymnastics.
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Sirius B
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Message 103853 - Posted: 5 Apr 2021, 18:05:58 UTC - in response to Message 103849.  

Ah, so in your world, a 12 year old can drive a 44 ton vehicle.
If they pass the test, yes. Would you rather an unlicensed adult or a licensed child drove it?
Forgot you said this?
It's amazing people don't see a problem with the government monitoring us all this closely. They have no right to know you've been born.
So you're saying that there should be no restrictions whatsoever.
How does a 12 year old be able to get licensed?
What determines that the child is actually 12?
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Peter Hucker
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Message 103856 - Posted: 6 Apr 2021, 9:40:23 UTC - in response to Message 103847.  

It's snowing. Brrrr.
Must be the global warming [scoff]
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Peter Hucker
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Message 103857 - Posted: 6 Apr 2021, 9:42:40 UTC - in response to Message 103853.  

Ah, so in your world, a 12 year old can drive a 44 ton vehicle.
If they pass the test, yes. Would you rather an unlicensed adult or a licensed child drove it?
Forgot you said this?
It's amazing people don't see a problem with the government monitoring us all this closely. They have no right to know you've been born.
So you're saying that there should be no restrictions whatsoever.
How does a 12 year old be able to get licensed?
What determines that the child is actually 12?
You don't seem to be understanding me. The ability to drive should not be based on age at all, but on skill. Therefore don't need proof of age. I've seen a few (approx. can't remember exact age) 13 year olds drive a racing car better than almost every adult. He/she are winning championships. Are you telling me those kids shouldn't be on the main roads?
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Message 103868 - Posted: 6 Apr 2021, 19:44:54 UTC - in response to Message 103857.  

Ah, so in your world, a 12 year old can drive a 44 ton vehicle.
If they pass the test, yes. Would you rather an unlicensed adult or a licensed child drove it?
Forgot you said this?
It's amazing people don't see a problem with the government monitoring us all this closely. They have no right to know you've been born.
So you're saying that there should be no restrictions whatsoever.
How does a 12 year old be able to get licensed?
What determines that the child is actually 12?
You don't seem to be understanding me. The ability to drive should not be based on age at all, but on skill. Therefore don't need proof of age. I've seen a few (approx. can't remember exact age) 13 year olds drive a racing car better than almost every adult. He/she are winning championships. Are you telling me those kids shouldn't be on the main roads?

I'm not sure that race car skills equate to safe driving skills on the public roads.
One, on a track everybody is normally diving in the same direction.
Two, overtaking in a race can be done on any side and even over the kerbs and beyond.
Three, at a race track crashes are expected and measures are taken to protect all people close to the track, almost completely the opposite to what happens in a city center. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-56648171
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Profile Gary Charpentier
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Message 103871 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 0:58:58 UTC - in response to Message 103868.  
Last modified: 7 Apr 2021, 0:59:23 UTC

I might add the maturity to not do stupid things to show off and impress members of the opposite sex, to understand the true life long consequences of choices. It isn't all about being able to do it once, it is about the ability to do it every time no matter what distractions or pressures are applied by outside agents.
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Peter Hucker
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Message 103891 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 17:15:12 UTC - in response to Message 103868.  

I'm not sure that race car skills equate to safe driving skills on the public roads.
One, on a track everybody is normally diving in the same direction.
Two, overtaking in a race can be done on any side and even over the kerbs and beyond.
Three, at a race track crashes are expected and measures are taken to protect all people close to the track, almost completely the opposite to what happens in a city center. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-56648171
The ability to do well on a race track means you will have more than excellent skills on a public road.

I might add the maturity to not do stupid things to show off and impress members of the opposite sex, to understand the true life long consequences of choices. It isn't all about being able to do it once, it is about the ability to do it every time no matter what distractions or pressures are applied by outside agents.
That is not age dependant.
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robsmith
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Message 103893 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 17:56:13 UTC - in response to Message 103891.  

The ability to do well on a race track means you will have more than excellent skills on a public road.

As one who held an RAC/MSC National license for quite a few years I can honestly say yo are talking total and utter rubbish - you've obviously never driven in a proper race on a proper race track. Even with "novices" the standard of discipline is far, far higher than one sees any day on the road.
Something to consider - On the road you are faced with TRAFFIC, about half of it ONCOMING TRAFFIC, there are PEDESTRIANS, there are CYCLISTS, there are MOTORBIKES, there are HORSES. On a race track, while the speeds are higher than legal on the public highway (normally), but the vast majority of other vehicles are going the same way as you, there are vanishingly few of the other "mobile chicanes" that one sees on the road (unless you are in a truck or motorbike race, in which case those can be expected).

(Most hilarious race I ever took part in was a 12 hour 2-CV race, top sped of those things is barely 70, but the fun factor is very high once you get over the feeling of sea-sickness due to their rolling motion....)
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Profile Gary Charpentier
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Message 103894 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 17:57:37 UTC - in response to Message 103891.  

That is not age dependant.
So add a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory to the driving test!

Age however is a good tool in general to judge maturity and used nearly universally in judicial contexts.
"Never trust a person over 30."
"President must be at least 35"
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Profile Gary Charpentier
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Message 103895 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 18:01:20 UTC - in response to Message 103893.  

I'll add how many guys in the pit get hit every year? I don't think the public would stand for a similar rate of pedestrians being hit on the public streets.
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Sirius B
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Message 103896 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 18:10:32 UTC - in response to Message 103868.  

As evidenced in various episodes of Traffic Cops.
As for young drivers (today's society), the best IMHO was Series 7 episode 9.
A young driver, quite legal docs wise got stopped & would probably have been given a verbal warning. instead he became a "barrack room lawyer".
He was stopped for not wearing a seat belt. A soon as the officer approached him, grabbed his phone & started videoing.
Gave his name & d.o.b. but refused to give his address as the police had no legal requirement for that info.
He persisted with that which earned him a trip to the nick.
There he still refused to divulge has address.
Ended up in court & fined £215.
I can't see how such muppets manage to get a qualified license.
It is a legal requirement that docs are presented if requested by a police officer, if not available to hand, one has 7 days to provide at a station.
On a stop several years ago on way to work, no arguments gave officer my license. He was a bit amazed, especially when I told him I always carry it & as I'm on way to work, also a legal requirement.
He gave me a funny look as there is no legal requirement. Had to explain that a truck driver has a legal requirement to carry 3 docs with him:
Gave him all 3. He just nodded & gave me a warning about wearing seatbelts.
Also told him that ANPR cameras don't help them if a company vehicle is being driven by a qualified or disqualified driver.. Having a license on your person saves a lot of hassle.
Job done.
No hassle.
No fine.
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Profile Dave

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Message 103897 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 18:42:47 UTC - in response to Message 103896.  

Job done.
No hassle.
No fine.

Reminds me of one time I was returning from mainland Europe when in the army with rather more booze than allowed. (Like a factor of five). I declared it all and was waved through. Someone else tried to sneak a couple of bottles of spirits extra through without declaring it, had the booze confiscated and had to pay the duty on it as well.
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betreger
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Message 103898 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 18:53:49 UTC - in response to Message 103893.  

The ability to do well on a race track means you will have more than excellent skills on a public road.

As one who held an RAC/MSC National license for quite a few years I can honestly say yo are talking total and utter rubbish - you've obviously never driven in a proper race on a proper race track. Even with "novices" the standard of discipline is far, far higher than one sees any day on the road.
Something to consider - On the road you are faced with TRAFFIC, about half of it ONCOMING TRAFFIC, there are PEDESTRIANS, there are CYCLISTS, there are MOTORBIKES, there are HORSES. On a race track, while the speeds are higher than legal on the public highway (normally), but the vast majority of other vehicles are going the same way as you, there are vanishingly few of the other "mobile chicanes" that one sees on the road (unless you are in a truck or motorbike race, in which case those can be expected).

(Most hilarious race I ever took part in was a 12 hour 2-CV race, top sped of those things is barely 70, but the fun factor is very high once you get over the feeling of sea-sickness due to their rolling motion....)

Which once again proves it is more fun to drive a slow cat fast than a fast car slow.
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Sirius B
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Message 103899 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 19:21:34 UTC - in response to Message 103897.  

Couldn't stop laughing as that reminded me when going though Heathrow after Crusader & Lionheart exercises.
In the pre-EU days, BAOR was considered outside the EEC duty zone.
Way over the limit not just with mine but carrying for others (Yeah I know risky), but being a cheeky chappie, went through the red channel.
Told them I was either under or over,about £10 explaining how I arrived at that.
No problem, paid £1 duty.
Great fun collecting dosh on the coach back to the barracks. :-)
Only did it twice though - 3rd time unlucky & didn't want to push my luck.
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Message 103900 - Posted: 7 Apr 2021, 19:44:53 UTC - in response to Message 103899.  

Crusader is one I have done. 244 Signal Squadron MAOT troop worked with RAF officers running landing sites for helicopters. Also did Hardfall in Norway four winters in a row.
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Peter Hucker
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Message 103909 - Posted: 9 Apr 2021, 17:08:05 UTC - in response to Message 103893.  
Last modified: 9 Apr 2021, 17:09:42 UTC

The ability to do well on a race track means you will have more than excellent skills on a public road.
As one who held an RAC/MSC National license for quite a few years I can honestly say yo are talking total and utter rubbish - you've obviously never driven in a proper race on a proper race track. Even with "novices" the standard of discipline is far, far higher than one sees any day on the road.
Something to consider - On the road you are faced with TRAFFIC, about half of it ONCOMING TRAFFIC, there are PEDESTRIANS, there are CYCLISTS, there are MOTORBIKES, there are HORSES. On a race track, while the speeds are higher than legal on the public highway (normally), but the vast majority of other vehicles are going the same way as you, there are vanishingly few of the other "mobile chicanes" that one sees on the road (unless you are in a truck or motorbike race, in which case those can be expected).

(Most hilarious race I ever took part in was a 12 hour 2-CV race, top sped of those things is barely 70, but the fun factor is very high once you get over the feeling of sea-sickness due to their rolling motion....)
It's the same skills for both. Avoiding other stuff. But in the race the other stuff is faster.

How did you get the 2CV to run for 12 hours?

That is not age dependant.
So add a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory to the driving test!

Age however is a good tool in general to judge maturity and used nearly universally in judicial contexts.
"Never trust a person over 30."
"President must be at least 35"
It's a terrible tool - just look at the presidents that are past retirement age for any other job.
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Peter Hucker
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Message 103910 - Posted: 9 Apr 2021, 17:11:11 UTC - in response to Message 103895.  
Last modified: 9 Apr 2021, 17:12:58 UTC

I'll add how many guys in the pit get hit every year? I don't think the public would stand for a similar rate of pedestrians being hit on the public streets.
On the public streets you aren't in so much of a hurry. And the public aren't trying to get to your car quickly to change a tyre. And most public run down is due to their own fault. When I went to school we were taught the green cross code. Nowadays pedestrians seem to think they can just walk across a busy road and the cars will get out of their way.

As evidenced in various episodes of Traffic Cops.
As for young drivers (today's society), the best IMHO was Series 7 episode 9.
A young driver, quite legal docs wise got stopped & would probably have been given a verbal warning. instead he became a "barrack room lawyer".
He was stopped for not wearing a seat belt. A soon as the officer approached him, grabbed his phone & started videoing.
Gave his name & d.o.b. but refused to give his address as the police had no legal requirement for that info.
He persisted with that which earned him a trip to the nick.
There he still refused to divulge has address.
Ended up in court & fined £215.
I can't see how such muppets manage to get a qualified license.
It is a legal requirement that docs are presented if requested by a police officer, if not available to hand, one has 7 days to provide at a station.
On a stop several years ago on way to work, no arguments gave officer my license. He was a bit amazed, especially when I told him I always carry it & as I'm on way to work, also a legal requirement.
He gave me a funny look as there is no legal requirement. Had to explain that a truck driver has a legal requirement to carry 3 docs with him:
Gave him all 3. He just nodded & gave me a warning about wearing seatbelts.
Also told him that ANPR cameras don't help them if a company vehicle is being driven by a qualified or disqualified driver.. Having a license on your person saves a lot of hassle.
Job done.
No hassle.
No fine.
In the UK you are not required to carry any papers. I thought only Russia still did things like that. The only muppet in the above was the bacon.
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Peter Hucker
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Message 103911 - Posted: 9 Apr 2021, 17:13:59 UTC - in response to Message 103897.  
Last modified: 9 Apr 2021, 17:15:48 UTC

Job done.
No hassle.
No fine.

Reminds me of one time I was returning from mainland Europe when in the army with rather more booze than allowed. (Like a factor of five). I declared it all and was waved through. Someone else tried to sneak a couple of bottles of spirits extra through without declaring it, had the booze confiscated and had to pay the duty on it as well.
I thought you meant inside you! You can get away with that too as most cops aren't bright enough to tell you've had a few.

(Most hilarious race I ever took part in was a 12 hour 2-CV race, top sped of those things is barely 70, but the fun factor is very high once you get over the feeling of sea-sickness due to their rolling motion....)

Which once again proves it is more fun to drive a slow cat fast than a fast car slow.
Neither is as good as a fast car fast.
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Message boards : The Lounge : Grumbles, Glory and Covid-19 (2)

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