Giving a Title to what we are doing.

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Cruncher Pete

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Joined: 21 Jun 18
Posts: 16
Message 88545 - Posted: 20 Oct 2018, 11:27:37 UTC

We have been using the Acronym BOINC ever since its creation by Dr David Anderson many years ago. Since that time BOINC has developed and now we in fact are running two different software used for identical purposes. Personally, it took me a long time to get used to the meaning of BOINC not just the name but what it means for when you break it down none of the words suggests that it is used for assisting Scientists in the main in their research by volunteering our computer resources.

I wonder if we could debate the possibility of changing our name to a more appropriate name depicting the main purpose of what we are doing rather than an Acronym. Just as a quick thought without researching and ideal name, I would use one title but with two qualifiers that could be explained in the intro to the subject: Example

United Science Research Volunteers.

a. Unattended option[/u] where you set and forget, just select whatever science you prefer and the projects will be downloaded to your computer.

b.[u] Self select option
. where you select your own project or projects and join a team of other volunteers exchanging various options that is available like participating in challenges and comparing equipment to receive more credit than a single computer which you could use as a metric comparing to others.

That is my thoughts, what do you think? Let us debate it.
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dduggan47

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Joined: 22 Nov 08
Posts: 16
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Message 88573 - Posted: 22 Oct 2018, 14:30:14 UTC - in response to Message 88545.  

I just discovered this form today. I agree, Pete, that something along those lines would be a great idea.

I've been running BOINC since soon after it started. (My SETI@HOME page says 1999 but I think that was the pre-BOINC version.) I've recently seen data indicating that the number of BOINC users is declining and I hope there's something that can be done to reverse that trend. I talk it up to friends from time to time but they just think I'm an old nerd.

I just went and looked at the Publicizing BOINC (https://boinc.berkeley.edu/wiki/Publicizing_BOINC) article on the Berkeley Wiki. It appears though to have been dormant for the last 4 years.

Perhaps project admins could urge their volunteers to write letters (see the Publicizing BOINC suggestions) or whatever other possibilities they can think of. Maybe that could be done annually. What's the official birthday of BOINC?

Here in the US most schools have science clubs. Maybe the teachers who run those would be interested in a presentation for club members on what BOINC is and why it's a good idea.

A downloadable brochure was mentioned elsewhere here and that also would be a very useful idea.

(Pete, I apologize if I've sort of hijacked the thread you started with lots of other stuff. It's all related to helping BOINC get more volunteers though.)
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jglrogujgv

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Joined: 6 Jul 18
Posts: 40
Barbados
Message 88579 - Posted: 22 Oct 2018, 22:32:31 UTC - in response to Message 88545.  

We have been using the Acronym BOINC ever since its creation by Dr David Anderson many years ago. Since that time BOINC has developed and now we in fact are running two different software used for identical purposes.


Nope. It's the same software with a new layer that allows users to attach projects in a what is purported to be a new, easier way. That new layer sits on top of the same old software. It might appear on the surface to be two different versions but if you look below the surface it rests firmly on the twin pillars referred to as the client and the server.

Personally, it took me a long time to get used to the meaning of BOINC not just the name but what it means for when you break it down none of the words suggests that it is used for assisting Scientists in the main in their research by volunteering our computer resources.

United Science Research Volunteers.

a. Unattended option[/u] where you set and forget, just select whatever science you prefer and the projects will be downloaded to your computer.

b.[u] Self select option
. where you select your own project or projects and join a team of other volunteers exchanging various options that is available like participating in challenges and comparing equipment to receive more credit than a single computer which you could use as a metric comparing to others.


Then we would have two names that would almost immediately be converted to the following acronyms: USRVU and USRVSS. How do those reflect what they are is all about any better than the BOINC acronym? Neither of them suggest it involves networking and computers. USRVU suggests unattended volunteers who are doing something for science. But what are they doing? Fetching coffee for scientists? Gathering data in the field for scientists? And what does USRVSS suggest that distinguishes it from USRVU... the volunteers self-select what they're fetching and who they're fetching it for?

Think about it... What name could possibly conjure all the nuances and functionality in BOINC in a better way? No matter what the name or acronym one still has to do a little reading to get even a cursory idea of what it's about. So the better name (and logo) is one that somehow catches one's attention and instantly creates a desire to investigate further. What they read in the next 20 to 50 words, or so the marketing experts tell us, either hooks the reader or makes him look for the next interesting looking link.

The only name I can think of that might be more informative would be to substitute the word Volunteer for Network which yields BOIVC. Unfortunately BOIVC doesn't roll off the tongue as nicely as BOINC does. At least not for English speakers.
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Message boards : Promotion : Giving a Title to what we are doing.

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