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Richard Haselgrove
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Message 81500 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 15:01:34 UTC - in response to Message 81497.  

I can't answer that question directly - but I have in front of me a 1976 certified copy of my mother's 1930 birth certificate. Her first name is spelled 'Jennifer', when she'd been known as 'Jenifer' for the previous 45 years. That certainly worried her - she had them go back and check it. And I had to make sure that all variants were listed on her death certificate, just in case somebody refused to pay up on an insurance policy or something. So she has three names on her death certificate: "Jenifer ... otherwise Jennifer ... formerly known as Haselgrove".

The only suggestion I have for your problem is that you can always get a certified, pukka, copy of a birth certificate, which is accepted wherever a birth certificate is needed.

Unless you were born in a country with a less well established, or less accessible, public records service than the UK...

The copy UK certificate issued under the 1953 Act (which still seems to be the way of doing things here) says on the back that an additional name (such as one given in Christian baptism) can be added to the register, and hence to the certificate, if the certificate of baptism or naming is dated less than 12 months after the birth was registered.
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Profile Jord
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Message 81501 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 15:03:35 UTC - in response to Message 81497.  

The civil servant doesn't have the apprehension to deduce that when your father and mother share that surname, that that's yours as well?
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Richard Haselgrove
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Message 81502 - Posted: 20 Sep 2017, 15:06:48 UTC - in response to Message 81501.  

On my mother's certificate, there are two first names, and no surname - "me me them", as you suggest.
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anniet
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Message 81520 - Posted: 21 Sep 2017, 13:43:21 UTC
Last modified: 21 Sep 2017, 13:44:56 UTC

Accessibility is on the far awayish side of the equator, Richard - but there is a high commission in Kensington.

How embassies feel about their official documents being rubbished would be interesting to find out I think... ;)

On my mother's certificate, there are two first names, and no surname - "me me them", as you suggest.
And no one ever tossed it aside and demanded to see her adoption papers?

Or got shirty with her for blinking blankly at them while they growled about enrolled deedpolls at some Royal Court or other ?

I'm going to take a flying leap now and guess your answer is no.

.-^ " " * \ no

Deedpolling myself to fit the certificate might not be necessary then...Thank you! :) I don't think they liked that suggestion much anyway.

The civil servant doesn't have the apprehension to deduce that when your father and mother share that surname, that that's yours as well?
The monotonous regularity with which these people rear up out of the woodwork and set about taking an egg beater to my brain, is more than a mere curse can explain, Jord. I think. Yes.

:)

edit: thank you for the replies
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Richard Haselgrove
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Message 81521 - Posted: 21 Sep 2017, 14:30:05 UTC - in response to Message 81520.  
Last modified: 21 Sep 2017, 14:32:05 UTC

Since I've had to go through all this recently, and I've still got the box of papers handy...

Both my father's January 1953 copy certificate, and my stepfather's August 1926 original certificate - issued under Acts of 1836 to 1874 - only show the 'given' names (two, in each case). Leaving the surname to be deduced from the current names of their respective fathers and mothers (the same in both cases, as it happens): former surnames of the women are also listed. So, it all seems very standardised, as you might expect.

Oh, I should have answered. No.
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anniet
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Message 81529 - Posted: 21 Sep 2017, 19:17:16 UTC - in response to Message 81521.  

Since I've had to go through all this recently, and I've still got the box of papers handy...
That really is so kind of you to do :) Thank you.

Oh, I should have answered. No.
:))

I probably should have apologised for suggesting your mum ever blinked blankly at anyone...

;)
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Message 81570 - Posted: 25 Sep 2017, 0:24:34 UTC - in response to Message 81566.  

If you were not married at the time of the birth, the mother can register the birth alone but the father’s details will not be recorded.

Is that absolute?
I would think not. I could check with my cousin's youngest, who now lives down under. She was born after her father died in a road accident, I would find it very odd if his name was not on her birth certificate.
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anniet
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Message 81988 - Posted: 13 Oct 2017, 23:00:57 UTC

So everybody knows what to expect, I'll link it like this:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/oct/12/penguin-catastrophe-leads-to-demands-for-protection-in-east-antarctica

A colony of about 40,000 Adélie penguins in Antarctica has suffered a “catastrophic breeding event” – all but two chicks have died of starvation this year. It is the second time in just four years that such devastation – not previously seen in more than 50 years of observation – has been wrought on the population.


https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/oct/13/penguins-starving-death-something-very-wrong-antarctic

Over the next year we have the opportunity to create an Antarctic Ocean Sanctuary – the largest protected area on Earth – which would put the waters off-limits to the industrial fishing vessels currently sucking up the tiny shrimp-like krill, on which all Antarctic life relies.
We should do that - definitely. Yes.
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Profile Jord
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Message 81993 - Posted: 14 Oct 2017, 13:26:08 UTC

Hold on to your hats, Irish & English people, there's going to be a big whoosh coming. Her name is Ophelia. Her wrath may be violent.

@The Penguins, send all your (canned) fish to them.
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Sirius B
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Message 81994 - Posted: 14 Oct 2017, 15:15:36 UTC - in response to Message 81993.  

"A Met Office spokeswoman said: “The east side of the country certainly benefiting from some warmer temperatures into the weekend and at the start of next week.”"

Got my sunglasses handy :-)
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Profile Jord
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Message 82002 - Posted: 15 Oct 2017, 16:26:35 UTC

Just heard on the radio, Morrissey's new song Spent the day in bed.
Looking at the lyrics, it's not as down as you'd normally expect of Morrissey songs.
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Richard Haselgrove
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Message 82083 - Posted: 18 Oct 2017, 12:25:39 UTC - in response to Message 82079.  

The good news was that London and the SE missed all the bad weather. The even better news is that The State pension is going up next year.

Telegraph.
Yes. Only Tory-voting pensioners are protected from having to pay the bankers back for their misdemeanours.
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Profile Gary Charpentier
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Message 82124 - Posted: 20 Oct 2017, 13:23:47 UTC - in response to Message 82122.  

So how come these Johnny come lately light weights get more than I do for less work???

Kick the can down the road. Serious. They have no idea how to pay them but they had to promise it to get them to work at all. Pensions are the ultimate ponzi scheme.
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Sirius B
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Message 82199 - Posted: 24 Oct 2017, 12:58:01 UTC

Need more of this :-)

History pushed back 30 years
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Message 82240 - Posted: 25 Oct 2017, 10:24:01 UTC - in response to Message 82239.  

even though for local people it changes their personal lives.

What local people, there were no local people, well very few, before Heathrow was built.

They all moved there because of Heathrow.
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Message 82246 - Posted: 25 Oct 2017, 15:12:15 UTC - in response to Message 82241.  

Yes I know that Nick, I mean the local people NOW.

Heathrow Airport originated in 1929 as a small airfield (Great West Aerodrome) on land south-east of the hamlet of Heathrow from which the airport takes its name. At that time there were farms, market gardens and orchards there: there was a "Heathrow Farm" about where Terminal 1 is now, a "Heathrow Hall" and a "Heathrow House". This hamlet was largely along a country lane (Heathrow Road) which ran roughly along the east and south edges of the present central terminals area.

Development of the whole Heathrow area as a very much larger airport began in 1944: it was stated to be for long-distance military aircraft bound for the Far East. But by the time the airfield was nearing completion, World War II had ended. The government continued to develop the airport as a civil airport; it opened as London Airport in 1946 and was renamed Heathrow Airport in 1966.


The current fuss is about the third runway which will mean demolishing local villages, which understandably the locals are not happy about, apart from more air traffic over other local areas. When HS1 was built a number of people lost their homes when they were compulsorily purchased, and it will be the same for HS2. Apart from which those still left had a noisy rail line at the bottom of their garden.

You can understand NIMBY's.

My first recollection of Heathrow was was flying into Heathrow on a BAOC Britannia, before Comet flights were common, was all the reservoirs near Staines. Must have been about six at that time.
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robsmith
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Message 82248 - Posted: 25 Oct 2017, 15:33:51 UTC

I can still remember being in a Trident as it it groped its way in through the fog to a near perfect three-pointer, then had to wait for an escort vehicle as the flight crew couldn't see the taxiway lights.
And seeing Concorde depart on a misty November evening at full re-heat
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Sir Rodney Ffing
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Message 82290 - Posted: 27 Oct 2017, 18:04:59 UTC - in response to Message 82254.  

Dramatic plunge in insect numbers

Insects are an integral part of life on Earth as both pollinators and prey for other wildlife and it was known that some species such as butterflies were declining. But the newly revealed scale of the losses to all insects has prompted warnings that the world is “on course for ecological Armageddon”, with profound impacts on human society.
A matter of interest perhaps more appreciated in the seti cafe's bug thread, Tami. Thank you for bringing it to our attention. With your permission, I will repost there.
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Sir Rodney Ffing
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Message 82312 - Posted: 28 Oct 2017, 22:26:10 UTC - in response to Message 82296.  

Try Einstein. Nice crowd. :-)
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Richard Haselgrove
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Message 82317 - Posted: 29 Oct 2017, 7:48:30 UTC

The local regional airport is about 10 miles east of my house, and because of the same prevailing winds, most of the regular fare of holiday charter jets heads directly towards me. Most take a left turn and head south towards the sun, some continue straight on (to Dublin, perhaps?) and pass near enough directly overhead.

In its later years, when it was clear that Concorde wouldn't be expanding its route list of scheduled passenger services, the spare planes were used for those short excursion flights and regularly visited LBA. They were the only planes I could ever hear from my downstairs workroom, rush along the corridor and up the stairs, and still be in time to see fly overhead and off towards the Irish Sea. They were beautiful, but boy were they loud.
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