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Profile Jord
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Message 81989 - Posted: 13 Oct 2017, 23:04:28 UTC - in response to Message 81986.  

I must say, I got that number from the Dutch translation I read first. And thought that a cubic kilometer is already quite a bit. But apparently, according to some other articles, it can blow 1,000 cubic kilometers, which is nothing because it's storing 11,200 cubic miles of magma... My conversion program doesn't even have a cubic mile, but that doesn't matter anymore. It's way too much. ;-)
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anniet
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Message 82966 - Posted: 14 Nov 2017, 19:42:45 UTC

I'm trying to decide which one to read first https://www.livescience.com/50718-weekend-reading.html - 4 days late. Maybe the asteroid one. It's mostly to stay awake for as long as it takes to not burn what's in the oven.
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Profile Byron Leigh Hatch @ team Carl ...
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Message 84343 - Posted: 11 Jan 2018, 11:44:53 UTC
Last modified: 11 Jan 2018, 11:55:08 UTC

Meltdown and Spectre Expose the Dark Side of Superfast Computers.
As CES gets into full swing in Las Vegas,
one of the researchers responsible for part of last week’s security bombshell weighs in on the possible consequences

Scientific American

www.Scientific American.com/

By Larry Greenemeier on 9 January , 2018

quote

Hundreds of gadget makers and software companies at this week’s annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas are staking the success of their newest products on the latest and greatest processors from Intel, AMD, ARM and others. But those bets are looking shaky, even by Sin City’s standards, after last week’s bombshell that many of those processors are plagued by serious security vulnerabilities known as Meltdown and Spectre.

Processors lend a degree of intelligence to just about any electronic device—including the thousands of automobiles, home appliances and gaming systems displayed at the exhibition. It is now clear that the insatiable need for faster processors has had a dark side, as chipmakers cut corners on security, exposing potentially billions of personal computers, mobile devices and other electronics to a new crop of digital attacks for years to come.

Every computer relies on a piece of software known as a kernel to, among other things, manage the interactions between end-user applications—spreadsheets, Web browsers, etcetera—and the underlying central processing unit and memory. The kernel starts and stops the other programs, enforces security settings and restricts access to a device’s memory and data resources. Not surprisingly, the kernel’s speed determines how fast the computer performs as a whole. Chipmakers protect the kernel by isolating it from other programs running on the computer, unless those programs are given specific permission—or “privilege”—to access the kernel.

/quote

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

Larry Greenemeier is the associate editor of technology for Scientific American, covering a variety of tech-related topics, including biotech, computers, military tech, nanotech and robots.
Credit: Nick Higgins
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Profile Jord
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Message 84784 - Posted: 14 Feb 2018, 16:00:39 UTC

Crypto-currency craze 'hinders search for alien life'
Scientists listening out for broadcasts by extra-terrestrials are struggling to get the computer hardware they need, thanks to the crypto-currency mining craze, a radio-astronomer has said.

Seti (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) researchers want to expand operations at two observatories. However, it has found that key computer chips are in short supply.
"We'd like to use the latest GPUs [graphics processing units]... and we can't get 'em," said Dan Werthimer. Demand for GPUs has soared recently thanks to crypto-currency mining. "That's limiting our search for extra-terrestrials, to try to answer the question, 'Are we alone? Is there anybody out there?'," Dr Werthimer told the BBC.

"This is a new problem, it's only happened on orders we've been trying to make in the last couple of months." Mining a currency such as Bitcoin or Ethereum involves connecting computers to a global network and using them to solve complex mathematical puzzles. This forms part of the process of validating transactions made by people who use the currency. As a reward for this work, the miners receive a small crypto-currency payment, making it potentially profitable.
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Richard Haselgrove
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Message 84785 - Posted: 14 Feb 2018, 16:09:44 UTC

Meanwhile, Bitcoin energy use in Iceland set to overtake homes
Iceland is facing an "exponential" rise in Bitcoin mining that is gobbling up power resources, a spokesman for Icelandic energy firm HS Orka has said.

This year, electricity use at Bitcoin mining data centres is likely to exceed that of all Iceland's homes, according to Johann Snorri Sigurbergsson.
My opinion is that this craze has exceeded all reasonable limits.
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Message 90885 - Posted: 2 Apr 2019, 17:19:08 UTC

Muscle-like material expands and contracts in response to light

Scientists have developed a new material that expands and contracts, lifting a weight merely by shining a light on it.

Materials that respond to red or near-infrared light, which can penetrate human tissue, could be used in biomedical applications, such as drug-delivery devices or, eventually, as artificial muscles.

Barnes says that his group has only begun to test the limits of these new materials. Currently, the team is studying the self-healing properties of polyviologen-embedded hydrogels, and they are exploring the possibility of 3D printing the polymers into different types of materials.
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Message 97264 - Posted: 4 Apr 2020, 16:34:48 UTC

A team of researchers at the University of Cincinnati developed a tiny portable lab capable of plugging into your smartphone and diagnosing infectious diseases like COVID-19 and Lyme disease. The lab could also aid in identifying mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety. The findings appeared in the journal Microsystems & Nanoengineering. Source: Mental Daily / https://www.mentaldaily.com/article/2020/02/researchers-developed-tiny-lab-for-smartphone-diagnose-mental-health-conditions-and-diseases-coronavirus
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Message 105778 - Posted: 16 Oct 2021, 19:15:59 UTC

Scientists Detect 1,652 Radio Signals From Mysterious Source in Space

Fast radio bursts are a huge cosmic mystery, and now scientists have detected an unprecedented number of signals from one source in just 47 days.
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Message 105785 - Posted: 17 Oct 2021, 10:44:56 UTC

https://bigthink.com/starts-with-a-bang/big-bang-beginning-universe/
We used to think the Big Bang meant the universe began from a singularity. Nearly 100 years later, we're not so sure.

https://www.indiatoday.in/science/story/earth-receives-first-radio-signals-from-planet-outside-of-solar-system-1863850-2021-10-12

In a major discovery, astronomers have for the first time detected stars that are blasting radio signals hinting at the presence of hidden planets around them. The signals were picked up using the world’s most powerful radio antenna, the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) situated in the Netherlands.
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