Zooniverse quests

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Profile Jord
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Message 104377 - Posted: 13 May 2021, 12:43:52 UTC

Hi there,

I'm delighted to let you all know that we have two brand new, and very different Zooniverse projects for you this week. As always, the research teams behind these project cannot achieve their goals without your help! Therefore, they will be very grateful for any assistance you can give them with their research. Find out more, and learn how to get involved in these new projects below:

Drawing Knowledge

Are you interested in drawings and the arts?

The J. Paul Getty Museum is excited to announce the launch of their first crowdsourcing project Drawing Knowledge.

In this project, volunteers–– like you––will take the lead in describing and interpreting drawings from the Getty Museum’s extraordinary collection which includes works by artists such as Leonardo da Vinci and Vincent van Gogh. Participants will be presented with a random selection of drawings from over 1000 individual sheets and will be asked to share their knowledge and observations. Drawing Knowledge also seeks to foster an online community built around a shared appreciation of the drawings and hopes to spark lively discussions among participants and curators.

Your contributions will help us improve the experience of future visitors both in gallery and online. The collected data will inform the interpretation of drawing and improve the search functionality of the website by providing subject-tags, making the collection more accessible.

It’s time to “Getty” involved and give this project a try!

Learn more, and get involved at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/babkluna/drawing-knowledge


Drones for Ducks

Ever wanted to get a bird’s eye view…of birds?

Now you can, with the launch of Drones for Ducks! In this joint project from the University of New Mexico and US Fish and Wildlife, you’ll tag migratory birds in drone photos from wildlife refuges in New Mexico.

Every year, biologists count populations of migratory birds that spend the winter at wildlife refuges. They need to know how many birds there are to ensure there are enough resources to go around for everyone, and to track changes in the population over time. Migratory birds are important not only to one ecosystem but many as they complete their seasonal treks. Understanding impacts to their populations can help us understand environmental problems that span vast regions, even continents!

Our goal is to develop a whole new way of surveying wildlife populations that is less disruptive and more accurate than surveying on foot: using drones!

But we have one big problem—the large number of images that come from the drones makes counting birds by hand an overwhelming and time-consuming task. To get around this, we are developing an algorithm that can scan the images and automatically count and identify the birds for us. To work, the algorithm needs a large number of examples provided by humans of what each kind of bird looks like so that it can learn how to detect them on its own.

This is where you come in! By labeling ducks, geese, and cranes our drone imagery, you will help make that library of examples the algorithm needs to identify the birds. No birding experience required! At the project site, you can find a short tutorial that will teach you to identify ducks, geese, and cranes. You can also connect with the researchers on Talk, as well as on Twitter and Facebook!

Learn more, and join us at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/rowan-aspire/drones-for-ducks


Thanks so much for your continued efforts on the Zooniverse!
Grant & the Zooniverse Team
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Message 104406 - Posted: 18 May 2021, 15:25:53 UTC

Hi there,

In this weeks' Zooniverse newsletter I bring you news of a brand new project, a recently launched project that needs more help, and a virtual conference on NASA citizen science projects. Enjoy!


Woodpecker Cavity Cam

Researchers in Minnesota need your help to learn about the fascinating world of red-headed woodpecker nest cavities!

Red-headed woodpeckers are a striking, charismatic bird found in the Midwest and Eastern United States. Unfortunately, the species has experienced dramatic regional declines over the last 50 years. Scientists at Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, home to one of the densest breeding populations of red-headed woodpeckers in Minnesota, are studying this species to learn more about nest success and survival, habitat use, migration, movement patterns and competition with other wildlife species.

Red-headed woodpeckers excavate holes in trees for nesting. These cavities are also a vital resource for other animals, including bats, squirrels, tree frogs, and birds like nuthatches, blue birds, and chickadees which do not create cavities themselves but depend on their availability for breeding and roosting. Through the Woodpecker Cavity Cam Project, we hope to gain a better understanding of the diverse wildlife that compete for these cavities, and how they use them throughout the year. Using trail cameras installed at our red-headed woodpecker cavities, we are capturing video clips of the behaviors and interactions of the community of animals that depend on these holes. Midnight sneak attacks by flying squirrels, foiled egg and bird predation attempts, parents bringing insects to baby birds and sharing childcare duties…..our cameras document it all! With your help classifying video clips, our team of scientists and community members will advance our understanding of red-headed woodpeckers and the role they play in their community!

Learn more, and get involved at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/elwest/woodpecker-cavity-cam


Climate History Australia

Australia is no stranger to extreme weather and climate—from drought to bushfires, heatwaves and floods. We need to look at the past to better understand the future.

This project, run by the Australian National University (ANU) is a new citizen science project that aims to create Australia's longest daily weather record, beginning in 1838. We need volunteers to help close an eight-year gap in the daily weather of Adelaide, South Australia, from 1843 to 1856.

The ‘comments’ and ‘wind’ workflows are ideal for those who like working with words, and for those who like numbers there’s instrumental variables including attached thermometers, air temperature and air pressure. We’ve created 'Easy' sections for beginners, and you can work up the levels as you want more of a challenge!

These journals are over 170-years-old, and are some of the oldest weather records in the Southern Hemisphere. It’s amazing that these observations haven’t been transcribed or used in climate change research yet.

Our team is also preparing weather rescue projects for other regions in Australia, such as Perth, later this year. So this is your chance to get involved in the first of hopefully many more projects run by the team at Climate History Australia.

Find out more, and get involved at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/caitlinhowlett/climate-history-australia

One last thing:
CitSciCon, a two-day celebration of NASA citizen science projects and people will be taking place on Friday and Saturday (May 21-22). This event features a series of Zoom-based talks and events, and features a keynote presentation by our very own Zooniverse PI Chris Lintott on Saturday, 22 May 2021 at 12-1:30pm US Eastern time! Register/RSVP for that event, along with many other great sessions, by visiting the CitSciCon website, or tune in to the live stream on the Citizen Science Association's YouTube page.


As always, thanks for all your help!
Grant and the Zooniverse Team
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Message boards : The Lounge : Zooniverse quests

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