Xeon phi (31S1P) still beneficial in 2019

Message boards : Questions and problems : Xeon phi (31S1P) still beneficial in 2019
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ProDigit

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Message 93951 - Posted: 30 Nov 2019, 6:59:38 UTC
Last modified: 30 Nov 2019, 7:00:56 UTC

Hi!
I bought a Intel 31S1P Xeon Phi, a passively cooled PCIE card, because it was cheap.
Now I want to know what to do with it. So Boinc it will be.

1- Are they considered CPUs, or GPUs? (I presumed they'd be a CPU co processor using the PCIE interface)?
2- Are there any projects supporting this card?
3- Does Linux support this PCIE card?
4- Are they still relevant to today (considering the later Nvidia and AMD GPU alternatives out there with 4000+ GPU cores)?



Thanks!
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Profile Keith Myers
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Message 93954 - Posted: 30 Nov 2019, 7:48:32 UTC - in response to Message 93951.  

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Message 93972 - Posted: 1 Dec 2019, 14:27:57 UTC - in response to Message 93954.  

https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/hpc/Xeon-Phi-31s1p-Cooling-and-Motherboards-614/

Thanks for the article!
I found a $30 blower fan for the Phi on ebay.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/High-speed-Fan-Cooler-for-Intel-Xeon-Phi-Passive-Cooling-3-5-and-7-series/123977379340

I'm thinking the Phi was just some sort of PCIE CPU that would be recognized by Linux automatically (or after a driver install)?
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Message 94189 - Posted: 11 Dec 2019, 12:32:13 UTC - in response to Message 93951.  

Hi!
I bought a Intel 31S1P Xeon Phi, a passively cooled PCIE card, because it was cheap.
Now I want to know what to do with it. So Boinc it will be.

1- Are they considered CPUs, or GPUs? (I presumed they'd be a CPU co processor using the PCIE interface)?
2- Are there any projects supporting this card?
3- Does Linux support this PCIE card?
4- Are they still relevant to today (considering the later Nvidia and AMD GPU alternatives out there with 4000+ GPU cores)?

As far as I know there aren’t any BOINC projects that can use the Xeon Phi. You would be better off using an AMD or Nvidia GPU which various projects can make use of.
MarkJ
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Message 94210 - Posted: 12 Dec 2019, 2:11:22 UTC - in response to Message 94189.  
Last modified: 12 Dec 2019, 2:12:39 UTC

Hi!
I bought a Intel 31S1P Xeon Phi, a passively cooled PCIE card, because it was cheap.
Now I want to know what to do with it. So Boinc it will be.

1- Are they considered CPUs, or GPUs? (I presumed they'd be a CPU co processor using the PCIE interface)?
2- Are there any projects supporting this card?
3- Does Linux support this PCIE card?
4- Are they still relevant to today (considering the later Nvidia and AMD GPU alternatives out there with 4000+ GPU cores)?

As far as I know there aren’t any BOINC projects that can use the Xeon Phi. You would be better off using an AMD or Nvidia GPU which various projects can make use of.


The confusing thing about it all, is if the PCIE card is recognized as a CPU or not.
If it is, boinc will just crunch on them, as if they were 52-128 Intel Atom CPU cores

The primary problem is to get working drivers for Linux, which are available, but probably a bit above my head (I don't have the time or resources to figure out how to make it work, and run Boinc on it).
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Message boards : Questions and problems : Xeon phi (31S1P) still beneficial in 2019

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