Largest backlog?

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Roger Arevalo

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Joined: 7 Jul 18
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Message 86913 - Posted: 7 Jul 2018, 7:30:04 UTC

When deciding which projects to download, is there any way to find out which has the biggest backlog of work and most needs more people on the project? It would be good if each project description also showed how much computing capacity it needs and how much it has.
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MarkJ
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Message 86914 - Posted: 7 Jul 2018, 9:32:21 UTC

As as user you could use the server status page of each project.

Some of the projects show estimated work, and current compute capacity on their server status page, eg Einstein shows current capacity plus estimates in days for their gravity wave work. Asteroids shows just current capacity but no estimates on work. They almost all show number of work units available.

In a lot of cases it might be the project hasn’t got any idea how much data they have to process because it’s has a feed of data, so while they have it they’ll always have work (bar project issues). They wouldn’t be able to estimate how much compute capacity they need.
MarkJ
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Roger Arevalo

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Message 86915 - Posted: 7 Jul 2018, 9:48:49 UTC - in response to Message 86914.  

I hadn't seen the 'tasks ready to send' numbers before. There should definitely be a central place where you can see all of them listed together so you don't have to go to each project's website. Then you could see far more quickly who has work and how much of it.
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Les Bayliss
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Message 86916 - Posted: 7 Jul 2018, 11:03:09 UTC - in response to Message 86915.  

There's something that you can do then - research and create a website for tracking work loads for all of the projects.
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Profile Dave

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Message 86927 - Posted: 8 Jul 2018, 7:50:57 UTC

I tend to look rather for what value the project has and concentrate my efforts there assuming the project I most value has work. Prime Grid for instance is I assume always going to have enough work to keep anyone who attaches it supplied. Other projects depend on the scientists supplying requesting help, e.g. WCG which acts as an umbrella for many different sub projects. If I judge a project as having no or little intrinsic value, I will not urn it.
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Bob Harder

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Message 86934 - Posted: 8 Jul 2018, 11:37:15 UTC

Roger -

I understand your thought process but I don't think your idea is valid.

I participate in several projects and one, "Milkyway", only generates enough work units to make sure the "ready to send queue" queue does not go empty. So, with your idea, this project would always be near the bottom of your priority list, when in fact there may be lots and lots of work units that COULD be created.
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Sir LanDroid

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Message 87380 - Posted: 30 Jul 2018, 23:24:22 UTC - in response to Message 86913.  
Last modified: 30 Jul 2018, 23:26:23 UTC

I think that's an interesting way of determining where to put your resources. As far as World Community Grid, see link below summarizing 8 research projects and how far they have progressed. Listing a few examples indicating HUGE amounts of work yet to be done.

FightAids@Home Phase 2 - started September 2015 - 60% complete
Mapping Cancer Markers - started November 2013 - 61% complete
Childhood Cancer - started January 2017 - 53% complete
Etc...

https://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/research/viewAllProjects.do

Ni! Ni!

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Message boards : Projects : Largest backlog?

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