Roadkill & Hedgehogs

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Profile Chris S
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Message 81564 - Posted: 24 Sep 2017, 18:26:14 UTC

I think that those little people need all the support that they can get, but before I do, a mention of roadkill.

In the UK it is mainly hedgehogs, badgers, foxes, pheasants etc and the like. There were tales of tramps cooking and eating roadkill, but I'm not honestly sure that it actually happens today. But in America and Canada there are deer and moose etc that do get into fatal collisions with cars, which is rather different to flattened objects with tyre marks.

But, coming across a dead animal, you don't know how long it has been there. I wouldn't have thought that with flies laying eggs and other varmints gnawing at the carcass that it would in any way be safe to eat. But just me 2c m'lud.

Now back to Erinaceinae. The UK is making great efforts to preserve what few of them we have. Initiatives include tunnels under roads etc. The best I can really do is provide some links for you to read up on.

Devon Trust

St Tiggywinkles

British Hedgehogs

Telegraph
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kevin

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Message 81591 - Posted: 26 Sep 2017, 17:00:11 UTC - in response to Message 81564.  

I have noticed the number of roadkill hedgehogs has dropped dramatically in the past 20 years, I am sure that it is not just losses from the roads that has caused their decline.

I see, and try to avoid a lot of foxes and badgers on the road during the night, in some areas a fair number of rabbits as well.

As for larger roadkill - deer, If I have got space to stop and if it looks fresh, yes I will throw it on the back of the truck, my dogs (GSD'S) are fed on both raw and cooked meats and I like a little bit of bambi as well:-)
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Sir Rodney Ffing
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Message 81615 - Posted: 28 Sep 2017, 15:34:06 UTC - in response to Message 81591.  

I have noticed the number of roadkill hedgehogs has dropped dramatically in the past 20 years, I am sure that it is not just losses from the roads that has caused their decline.
Summarised for us here.

I see, and try to avoid a lot of foxes and badgers on the road during the night, in some areas a fair number of rabbits as well.
Some 50% of owl carcasses found in Britain, arise from collisions with vehicles I believe. Dawn to dusk are hazardous times for many creatures on roads. For those with a preference to avoid visiting death upon something under our wheels, motoring in Morocco during daylight hours is not something one does at speed. Dark asphalt = sunbathing reptiles. One driver avoiding them, does not mean the next will. :-(

As for larger roadkill - deer, If I have got space to stop and if it looks fresh, yes I will throw it on the back of the truck, my dogs (GSD'S) are fed on both raw and cooked meats and I like a little bit of bambi as well:-)
Some only recognise "fresh" if it's wrapped in plastic and has a date on it, Sir. ;-)
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kevin

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Message 81620 - Posted: 28 Sep 2017, 16:57:34 UTC - in response to Message 81615.  


Some only recognise "fresh" if it's wrapped in plastic and has a date on it, Sir. ;-)


I see on average a couple of Barn Owls a week, thankfully I have never hit one. Can't say the same for the pigeons during the late summer evenings:-(

The last bambi "recovered" was fresher than those found wrapped in plastic, and no it was not my motor that had hit it.
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Mark Stevenson

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Message 81622 - Posted: 28 Sep 2017, 18:26:06 UTC - in response to Message 81620.  

The last bambi "recovered" was fresher than those found wrapped in plastic, and no it was not my motor that had hit it.


There's plenty of dear around my way with Rendlesham forest a couple of miles away from where i live and dear hits happen regular around here , 9 times out of 10 the cars that hit the dears come off far worse than the dear do , 80% + of the cars are a write off and the dear are fine
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Message 81629 - Posted: 29 Sep 2017, 4:29:30 UTC - in response to Message 81622.  

The last bambi "recovered" was fresher than those found wrapped in plastic, and no it was not my motor that had hit it.


There's plenty of dear around my way with Rendlesham forest a couple of miles away from where i live and dear hits happen regular around here , 9 times out of 10 the cars that hit the dears come off far worse than the dear do , 80% + of the cars are a write off and the dear are fine


M1 Northampton area, Muntjac buck, It was hit by an semi, the headlights on one side were smashed and it had blown out the sidelight fuses, I was about 10 min behind him and was called and asked if I could give him assistance,
I got most of his lights working and a fitter was arranged to meet him at his destination to complete repairs, the deer was dead so I said thank you.
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Sir Rodney Ffing
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Message 81640 - Posted: 29 Sep 2017, 15:03:33 UTC - in response to Message 81622.  

For the good folk of Suffolk - to help record and map UK deer road casualty hotspots and related accidents would seem wise.

Likewise - to learn: Deer awareness day (Thursday 30 November @ Gt Whelnetham Community Centre, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP30 0TH - 9:00 -16:45)


80% + of the cars are a write off and the dear are fine


Extract from Highways England:

As not all deer are killed at the scene of the col­li­sion, it is also becom­ing a sig­nif­i­cant ani­mal wel­fare con­cern. There is a clear need to under­stand the scale of the issue and to exam­ine means to reduce it.


Wishing all a pleasant weekend. :-)
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Profile Chris S
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Message 81648 - Posted: 30 Sep 2017, 11:10:58 UTC

Government crackdown on animal cruelty means 5 years in prison.

Crackdown
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Sir Rodney Ffing
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Message 81652 - Posted: 30 Sep 2017, 17:52:09 UTC
Last modified: 30 Sep 2017, 18:02:47 UTC

Further to Message 81640:-

Section 170 of the Road Traffic Act 1980 deals with the duty to report an accident and specifically states that a driver must stop when involved in an accident by which ‘damage is caused to an animal other than an animal in or on that vehicle’.

Under this piece of legislation, ‘animal’ refers to horse, cattle, ass, mule, sheep, pig, goat or dog. Accidents involving other animals such as deer, cats, badgers, foxes, rabbits and pheasants do not need to be reported as a road traffic collision.

Collisions involving deer are particularly frequent and statistics obtained from The Deer Initiative show that the toll of deer involved annually in vehicle collisions in the UK is estimated to be between 42,000 to 74,000. Such deer related accidents result in over 450 human injuries and several human fatalities every year. Strictly speaking, the legislation referred to above does not require you to report a collision with a deer as it does not fall under any of the categories of animal listed.
A discrepancy worth review?

source
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kevin

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Message 81653 - Posted: 30 Sep 2017, 20:10:01 UTC - in response to Message 81652.  

A discrepancy worth review?

source


That depends on which way you read it, the definition to me seems to relate as to whether an animal is domesticated or wild, there are now other farmed animals including deer, but the majority of deer are wild animals.

The other item of interest is the correct procedure in the event of a badly injured deer, because I would not leave the scene even if I was not directly involved with the incident while a badly injured animal would possibly be left suffering.

Luckily nowadays we have the advantage of carrying mobile phones.
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kevin

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Message 81654 - Posted: 30 Sep 2017, 20:20:59 UTC - in response to Message 81648.  

Government crackdown on animal cruelty means 5 years in prison.

Crackdown


Better than nothing I suppose, Its a pity they cannot be treated the same way that they treated their animals.
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Profile Chris S
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Message 81657 - Posted: 1 Oct 2017, 7:29:51 UTC - in response to Message 81654.  

Better than nothing I suppose, Its a pity they cannot be treated the same way that they treated their animals.
One might very well think so, but then you get into the discussion of is an animals life worth more than a humans.

I'm passing on that one!!
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anniet
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Message 81666 - Posted: 1 Oct 2017, 18:57:05 UTC
Last modified: 1 Oct 2017, 19:06:38 UTC

‘damage is caused to an animal other than an animal in or on that vehicle’
Damage *place nose at 90 degree to Earth* is what says it all... to property... over a certain value...

As to the bit about not having to report "damage" sustained while "in or on that vehicle" ... including being crated off to abattoirs, is no doubt seen as a waste of police time, I mean... does it matter that the chicken you're roasting in the oven suffered a broken thigh bone on the way to the slaughter house and dislocated a wing when the slaughter house will at least put an end to it suffering? How many hours later will just add a little more to the bruising which a good dose of seasoning covers up in no time. It's value tada!! remains intact.

the definition to me seems to relate as to whether an animal is domesticated or wild
Then it could be argued cats should be on the list

*remember this morning...*

except they get a bit militant about being classed as domesticated sometimes.

Y-e-e-e-s... ;)

It's weird deer aren't on it though. It's not like they're an insignificant size or anything... or that they can't still pose a risk while splayed out in the road in their newly rendered state of immobilised - dead or alive :( They're not built as well as hedgehogs for becoming mostly flattened in one go :(

Even if we're only capable of calculating their "value" negatively, as a cost to us and leaving aside the humane issue, it doesn't make sense to leave the law as is I would have thought.

I would not leave the scene while a badly injured animal would possibly be left suffering.
I can't even leave the scene of a stepped-on snail to be honest. Being eaten alive by slugs can't be a pleasant way to go. I know I wouldn't like it.

I've seen dogs hit by cars that were seemingly "fine" afterwards (while the car was a little on the bit significantly dented side) only for them to die a few hours later from shock :/ which may have been prevented if the incident hadn't been brushed off as a lucky escape. I know from personal experience of receiving an injury ending in either a dazed/shocked/splayed-horizontal state whilst in a public place... I'd have to be dead before I'd claim to be anything other than fine until things proved otherwise, and all the while attempting to leap to my feet so I can go and collapse in private.

Everything alive probably suffers at least some rudimentary embarrassment from being the wrong way down or upside-over. Whether it's defined as vulnerability or fear - you don't want to show you're weaker than you were when you weren't a moment go, not if you can possibly help it anyway.
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kevin

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Message 81667 - Posted: 1 Oct 2017, 20:13:39 UTC - in response to Message 81666.  


It's weird deer aren't on it though. It's not like they're an insignificant size or anything... or that they can't still pose a risk while splayed out in the road in their newly rendered state of immobilised - dead or alive :( They're not built as well as hedgehogs for becoming mostly flattened in one go :(


The law was probably written in a way that enables animal owners to be able to seek recompense for losses rather than the welfare of the animals.

I've seen dogs hit by cars that were seemingly "fine" afterwards (while the car was a little on the bit significantly dented side) only for them to die a few hours later from shock :/ which may have been prevented if the incident hadn't been brushed off as a lucky escape. I know from personal experience of receiving an injury ending in either a dazed/shocked/splayed-horizontal state whilst in a public place... I'd have to be dead before I'd claim to be anything other than fine until things proved otherwise, and all the while attempting to leap to my feet so I can go and collapse in private.


Any fall or accident that could have caused a shock to the head (you do not need to strike the head) should always be checked out by professionals.
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Profile Chris S
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Message 81677 - Posted: 2 Oct 2017, 6:05:35 UTC

It's not as if there aren't warning signs. But at night you don't see the animals until the last moment.



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anniet
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Message 81754 - Posted: 3 Oct 2017, 18:49:35 UTC
Last modified: 3 Oct 2017, 18:51:54 UTC

But at night you don't see the animals until the last moment.
We didn't evolve to do anything at night other than to get warm and go to sleep... and perhaps get mystical under a full moon every few weeks.

Pelting along a road in a tin can on wheels is where we're not supposed to be.

*revolve nose around faces* and we call them the hazard.

Any fall or accident that could have caused a shock to the head (you do not need to strike the head) should always be checked out by professionals.


Good advice isn't always the first thing I think of...

;)
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kevin

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Message 81759 - Posted: 4 Oct 2017, 5:15:05 UTC - in response to Message 81754.  



Pelting along a road in a tin can on wheels is where we're not supposed to be.



Some of us have too, otherwise all those "next day deliveries" would not arrive on time.

My tin can carries about 34 pallets or cages of next day parcels.
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Message 81760 - Posted: 4 Oct 2017, 5:39:51 UTC - in response to Message 81759.  



Pelting along a road in a tin can on wheels is where we're not supposed to be.



Some of us have too, otherwise all those "next day deliveries" would not arrive on time.

My tin can carries about 34 pallets or cages of next day parcels.

And that would raise my blood pressure... not good.
Bird deaths: Pheasants 'most likely species' to die on UK roads
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Message 81761 - Posted: 4 Oct 2017, 6:05:55 UTC

The trouble with wild animals is that they become transfixed in headlights, whereas humans tend to run out of the way.

Ah yes next day parcels, a symptom of a must have it now society. But there will always be a night shift, some things can only be done when everyone else is out of the way e.g. road re-surfacing etc.

Jackson County, Oregon, has most uncooperative patients.
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Message 81767 - Posted: 4 Oct 2017, 10:39:16 UTC - in response to Message 81761.  

The trouble with wild animals is that they become transfixed in headlights, whereas humans tend to run out of the way.

Ah yes next day parcels, a symptom of a must have it now society. But there will always be a night shift, some things can only be done when everyone else is out of the way e.g. road re-surfacing etc.

Jackson County, Oregon, has most uncooperative patients.

It is not a case of have it now. It is a case of not being trapped in the house all day. Most on-line shopping companies only offer all day delivery options for normal deliveries and no notification of estimated arrival time. So I pay the extra and select the early deliveries.
Of the companies I deal with I must praise Scan, their delivery agents notify you of a one hour period when they will deliver, by email and text when they set off, and if you use the text option it is then narrowed to a 15 minute period. You can also track the delivery driver on-line.
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