The problem with that is...

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Message 81113 - Posted: 12 Sep 2017, 12:47:46 UTC - in response to Message 81098.  

The best energy drink is milk I mean... think about it*
Oh I did, I really did!

Milk

PETA*

It was me that said "The best energy drink is milk"

You're thinking is terribly biassed, and not very well thought out.
Try looking at people, like sportsmen, who do require an energy drink after a workout.
Most of them will recommend milk, probably chocolate flavoured for a little extra sugar, over any high priced and advertised energy drink.

And don't forget that we as a species, got were we are because our ancestors realised that cooked meat was easier to eat and gave them more energy. That extra energy meant that there was enough for the brain to grow. Our teeth have developed for the varied diet, having incisors and molars.
Stop trying to be what we are not, we are not vegetarians. If you don't take a lot of precautions then there are quite a few essentials missing in a vegan diet.
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Sirius B
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Message 81115 - Posted: 12 Sep 2017, 13:00:02 UTC - in response to Message 81113.  

True & there are more & more cases of vegans & vegetarians with serious health issues due to their diets.

The best comment regarding this was from a doctor reporting on some of those cases.

Dr Ruxton said "We know if you take a balanced plant-based diet - low in fat, sodium and alcohol - and add a healthy amount of lean red meat, grilled, you get the same results in terms of lowered cholesterol, blood pressure and weight,' she says.

'Meat isn't the issue, it's processed foods and sedentary lifestyles.'

She adds: 'We're advised to stick to 70g of red meat a day, but that's less a limit, more a requirement."
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Sirius B
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Message 81133 - Posted: 12 Sep 2017, 16:39:24 UTC

Hmm, get rid of dairy products?

That would not go down too well
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Sirius B
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Message 81148 - Posted: 12 Sep 2017, 18:13:42 UTC - in response to Message 81146.  

Vegetarian buffet is it?
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Profile Gary Charpentier
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Message 81149 - Posted: 12 Sep 2017, 19:08:09 UTC - in response to Message 81148.  

Vegetarian buffet is it?

PB&J?
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robsmith
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Message 81150 - Posted: 12 Sep 2017, 19:32:04 UTC

or BLT without the B, or the mayo, or the butter.....
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Sirius B
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Message 81151 - Posted: 12 Sep 2017, 20:42:31 UTC

Ah football over with a nice start to our Champions League campaign, a 6-0 win so enjoying a nice cheese & pickle sarnie & coffee :-)
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robsmith
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Message 81163 - Posted: 13 Sep 2017, 10:47:39 UTC

We proper townies know that the first rule of the countryside is that you keep gates SHUT to stop animals getting out and getting run over.

While that might sound to be "good advise", it can on occasion be the exact opposite of what is wanted - yes, shut gates that lead onto highways, but between fields they may be left open for animal husbandry reasons (access to water, licks, varied grazing, and so on. I do recall one day at my brother's place where some "kind soul" tied a gate closed between two field just after we'd opened it so we could move the flock from one filed to the next, the flock had decided to huddle in a hidden corner and so we went down there to encourage them up the hill, through the gate and into the new pasture - a job that normally took about 5 minutes took over two hours because when the sheep met the shut gate they scattered.
Hence "leave gates as you find them".
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Richard Haselgrove
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Message 81167 - Posted: 13 Sep 2017, 11:43:48 UTC - in response to Message 81158.  

We proper townies know that the first rule of the countryside is that you keep gates SHUT ...
Proper townies obviously can't read. "Leave all gates as you found them" has been written in the The Country[side] Code since at least 1981.
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Sir Rodney Ffing
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Message 81170 - Posted: 13 Sep 2017, 14:33:53 UTC
Last modified: 13 Sep 2017, 14:36:22 UTC

Being as I am somewhat late to this thread, weighing up the merits of posting the following has delayed its appearance, and warranted some editing.

What many people East of Southend eat fills me with disgust.
The delicacy of one's constitution might improve were it not labouring under the misapprehension "that most of Europe is very much cannibalistic" Sir. Indeed, for some 300 miles west of Southend, the comparative figures on this aberrancy discloses little to distinguish your nation from those lying to its east.

To construct persuasive arguments against the consumption of frogs:- "[eating] amphibian hind quarters is quite frankly cannibalistic" is destined to fail. They are a source of protein not dissimilar to chicken I am told. There are places not too far from my present location - where the entire frog is harvested locally, and eaten locally. To label those that do "cannibalistic", is insulting, Mr S. I trust that was not your intention? ;-)

Where condemnation is merited and harder to refute, and to be welcomed in a well-reasoned debate, is not that frogs are consumed, but:- how they are harvested; the distance between habitat and the nations on whose plates they are regarded as delicacy not nourishment. These nations did not sully their own hands to acquire them, nor wield the shears that removed them from their live producer; but the silent impoverishment of those distant communities now reliant on financing pesticides to bring in a crop - to do that which was once done at no cost - can too be laid at the door of the consumer. These are the arguments that can persuade, rather than defiantly entrench is my view.


Also we race certain 4 legged animals over here we don't eat them.
Some research into your country's relationship to the horse, racing or otherwise, will not go amiss, Sir.

With no agricultural products of our own on the rock, researching the practises I am supporting with every purchase is second nature to me. I see no likelihood I will ever forego meat - but I can rest easy knowing that the farmer gave the animal the best care possible beforehand.
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Sirius B
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Message 81177 - Posted: 13 Sep 2017, 17:52:50 UTC - in response to Message 81174.  

Towns and townies will still be around in two centuries time, I doubt many farmers will be as demand for their products dwindles.
Just wishful thinking on your part.

One part of food culture

2 centuries from now, the lone city dweller activist will be a thing of the past.
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anniet
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Message 81178 - Posted: 13 Sep 2017, 18:40:30 UTC

I don't have time for a post. I'm stealing these two minutes as it is :/ but two quick questions:

You said you're 75% veggie Chris. At what age did you become not-yet-vegetarian? ;)

How long before Londoners started eating rats, and pets, foxes and pigeons, earthworms (or tree bark in the case of myself) if every delivery of sustenance from outside was stopped?

Oh... it's actually three questions...

No it isn't. I've been found...
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Sirius B
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Message 81181 - Posted: 13 Sep 2017, 19:13:50 UTC - in response to Message 81180.  

So you're quite happy that this island will be held to ransom by every nation on the planet, just to make your views valid? Sad.

I doubt many farmers will be as demand for their products dwindles.
Making such wide sweeping generalisations such as that is not "that" intellectually smart.

Where will the food for vegans & vegetarians come from in your "world"
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Sirius B
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Message 81184 - Posted: 13 Sep 2017, 19:31:51 UTC - in response to Message 81182.  

I am 75% veggie now, that is correct. I made the change some years ago at age 60. I just wasn't happy with what I was eating, the taste of it, and the way I knew it was reared, and killed. I only wish that I had made that transition many years earlier. But better late than never.
So you enjoyed meat & dairy products for 60 years & now going the other way while many vegans & vegetarians are turning the other way due to the health issues caused by being either vegan or vegetarian.

Makes perfect sense :-)
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Message 81200 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 0:50:55 UTC - in response to Message 81189.  

up until age 16, you ate what your parents served you. When you got married at the average age of mid 20's, you ate what your wife served you.

Obviously I did things wrong by your reasoning.
I learnt to cook at about 11 years old, just after I worked it out that my maternal grandmother didn't let my mum do any of the cooking when we went there on leave. Xmas present from Gran that year was a cook book, still got it.

Didn't get married until mid 30's.

Couldn't stop smiling at wife's expression when youngest came home from school, and asked his mum what for tea. She said "Don't know, your dad's cooking it." Oh goody" he shouted running into kitchen.That was less than 6 months before we separated, he came to live with me.
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Mark Stevenson

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Message 81207 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 6:47:43 UTC - in response to Message 81189.  

Like most people, up until age 16, you ate what your parents served you. When you got married at the average age of mid 20's, you ate what your wife served you. It is only in later years that some decide on moral grounds to make a stand against what they believe to be wrong.


End of the day it's personal choice , if Chris don't want to eat meat or other dairy products that's totaly up to him or any individual . the only problem i see same as religious beliefs is when you start trying to force your views on anybody else . Someone tried that with me they would find themselfs on their arse probably with a bloody nose or spitting out a few teeth and it don't matter if they are male , female or some transgender devient the same thing would happen to them .
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anniet
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Message 81226 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 12:54:51 UTC

I'm going to split this part off from the rest of what I'm wanting to comment on, people. They're a bit higgledy-piggledy and unattributed, for which I apologise.

You only have to look at the shelves in your local supermarket to see what is the most popular, and yes, customers will pay extra
Not all can afford to. In fact some of the worst practises in the textile and farming (and finance industries for that matter) etc will continue to flourish as long as wealthy countries sport an economic underclass that can't afford to make ethical choices a lot of the time.


Seems to be the same question when they burn ivory. The demand doesn't go away, the supply went down, the price goes up and more poachers make a living. Or at least that is the economic theory behind it.
Then, once the source is exterminated, you cut out the poacher and the value of what is hoarded in your vault becomes almost incalculable :(


Did anyone ask the bull for an opinion?
They tend to get aggressive while you hang around waiting for their view on it. We may have domesticated them but we haven't changed the fundamentals that evolution provided them with. If that means fighting to the death to get their way with a herd of ladies whilst they're... erm ... tackle-in so to speak, they will. That's why, while we're farming cattle, we don't want too many bulls. The injuries to one another are awful :( and to the herd and their calves so we turn some into steer and others into veal (for eating) and some become matador fodder, and others go to stud. I don't know how much of the beef I've consumed over the years came from the male of the species, but there must have been some. Even if I call that some, one, it still would mean I'm two rocky mountain oysters short of what I should have been prepared to eat when I was prepared to eat any of him *blink* which is something to ponder on.



Ah! Are you suggesting that frogs legs are harvested by cutting them off from live frogs?
Chris, I may be wrong - but it increasingly looks like your objection to eating frogs is less about cruelty and more about distaste at the thought. I stand open to correction - but the "justification" for cutting the legs off while the frog is alive, is to stop the flesh and/or skin becoming bitter or even toxic. Most frogs have evolved a means of punishing whatever tries to eat them by means of foul secretions, both internally and externally. A quick snip in half solves that problem and preserves the edibility of the hind legs. That is why I first came to object to parts of them being added unnecessarily to the human diet. That the people who do the harvesting are only paid for the legs, and at a pittance rate, means the uncommercial part of the frog is not humanely dealt with, but just left to die :(


These are the arguments that can persuade, rather than defiantly entrench is my view.

If you mean sitting on the fence, why not say so.
None of that sounded like sitting on the fence to me. If I'd been noshing on green legs that tasted a bit like chicken then read that, I don't think another green leg would have even been licked by me again. Your cannibalistic one might have just left me wondering why you'd climbed the tree you'd fallen out of in the erm... first place...

*duck branch*

;)


In UK horse racing it is common practice to shoot race horses on the course in front of the public if they fall and break a leg. Yes of course they can be saved with treatment, but they won't race again, and therefore are of no use to the owners any more. It is a barbaric practice, and The RSPCA ought to have the guts to lobby the government to stop it.
What about the ones that get injured or sick out of the public eye?

Pop "fly tipping dead horses" into a search engine, Chris. They're not always dead when they're dumped either :( I think there was one last year with a broken neck that died some time after it was dumped. We have a terrible record when it comes to horses :[

I repeat for those hard of hearing and myopic WE DO NOT EAT HORSES!!!!
No people, we don't. We run them into the ground then feed them to greyhounds (another dreadfully treated and exploited animal we race, then starve, then dump).


I will be back later... I have to get attached to something at the doctor's and then bring it home with me.
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robsmith
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Message 81227 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 13:02:01 UTC

I will be back later... I have to get attached to something at the doctor's and then bring it home with me.


That sounds kinky ;-)
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Message 81228 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 13:15:07 UTC - in response to Message 81176.  

I repeat for those hard of hearing and myopic WE DO NOT EAT HORSES!!!!

Horse meat is the culinary name for meat cut from a horse. In some areas, also referred to as "Equene". It is a major meat in only a few countries, notably in Central Asia, but it forms a significant part of the culinary traditions of many others, from Europe to South America to Asia. The top eight countries consume about 4.7 million horses a year. For the majority of humanity's early existence, wild horses were hunted as a source of protein. It is slightly sweet, tender and low in fat.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_meat

In the United Kingdom, the slaughter, preparation, and consumption of horses for food is not against the law, although it has been rare since the 1930s and it is not generally available. There is a cultural taboo against consuming horse meat in the UK, although it was eaten when other meats were scarce, such as during times of war (as was whale meat, which was never popular in Britain). The sale of meat labelled as horse meat in supermarkets and butchers is minimal, and most of the properly described horse meat consumed in the UK is imported from Europe, predominantly the south of France, where it is more widely available.

Horse meat may be eaten without the knowledge of the consumer, due to accidental or fraudulent introduction of horse meat into human food. A 2003 Food Standards Agency (FSA) investigation revealed that certain sausages, salami and similar products such as chorizo and pastrami sometimes contain horse meat without it being listed, although listing is legally required.

Horse meat was featured in a segment in a 2007 episode of the Gordon Ramsay series The F Word. In the segment, Janet Street-Porter convinced locals to try horse meat, though not before facing controversy and being forced to move her stand to a privately owned location. The meat was presented as having a similar taste to beef, but with less fat, a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acid and a safer alternative in times of worry regarding bird flu and mad cow disease. The segment was met with skepticism from many after broadcast for various reasons, either because some felt the practice was cruel and against social norms, or simply a belief that if the taste was really on par with other meats, then people would already be eating it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_meat#United_Kingdom

In the Netherlands, smoked horse meat (paardenrookvlees) is sold as sliced meat and eaten on bread. Zuurvlees, a southern Dutch stew, is made with horse meat as main ingredient. There are also beef-based variants. Horse meat is also used in sausages (paardenworst and frikandel), fried fast food snacks and ready-to-eat soups.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_meat#Netherlands
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Profile Gary Charpentier
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Message 81229 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 13:23:18 UTC - in response to Message 81227.  

I will be back later... I have to get attached to something at the doctor's and then bring it home with me.


That sounds kinky ;-)

Holter monitor?
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